Answering questions about drills and skills.


Welcome back to Latosa Concepts, FMA blog.

I hope ya’ll are doing well. I was training with a member of our group the other day and some questions came up after he had taken a break from training with us. (he was some where else in the world)

We will answers some of his questions and hopefully remind others of the way we train. 

We’ll start with a look at the human body. The wrist is a weaker joint in relation to other joints on the arm. The shoulder is the clear winner for us regarding strength. This explains why blocks are weaker than attacks. Energy generated by the fig.-8 system gives support/and strength to the wrist. There is a mind set when training the fig.-8 system which is much more attacking in it’s nature as well. This supplies energy (aka strength) 

Now let’s look at the first three grades from what I teach. 1st. grade: fig-8 with focus on a drop, balance, ability to use a pushing back leg, a body rotation, and other aspects of power generation. 2nd grade: we start looking at higher attacks and continue with the fig-8 system. 3rd grade: We look at the box. In each grade there is palm stick and other weapons/ tool uses that work with the grade requirement. I don’t teach Wing Tsun unarmed then turn around and teach LC Concepts for sticks etc. Sorry WT people, Escrima is more than enough for me and well suited for many many uses. Especially when you see the transition from weapons sinawali’s in/to unarmed training. I don’t have to play mind games, I do one system! 

A video is posted below with and example of a cross strike to a low target with a basic box (box system) movement to a high target afterwards. 

The order could have been reversed if I chose to do it that day. The idea is to understand the power generation possibilities by using a classic fig-8 strike and then doing a suppressed Latosa box system movement. In short I am saying to the students that they need to learn to analyse what they are doing so they can use both.

In other words, I am teaching them to be warriors who can do what has to be done in a given situation (because it fits better and/or the simple fact that they can do it)! 

There is a difference in teaching soldiers and warriors. If this makes me a snob, so be it.  

Some training sessions are based on grade requirements and some are based on a theme that we are focusing on at the time. The ability to ping pong between classic box and classic fig-8 is the theme of the drills in the video below. At the moment we are looking at different ways to use the number 5 attack as a tool to use in different situations. 

Ya’ll should thank Dom for this explanation. He asked some question the other day. Now for the hard words that could open a can of worms. Many instructors don’t  demand what I demand of the students or maybe they have not put the time/thought into the order of subjects they teach. That’s an issue they will have to work out. For my guys, remember you are being taught in ways others are not taught. Many 1st graders (other systems) will not have a palm stick, a knife, do anti-grappling and more. Many 2nd grader in other systems will not train 2 stick open-8 and kop kop. It’s your job as student to remember what we are working on when I say (for example) it’s all about the ability to use a fig-8 strike, then a box attack, then a hard knock down with a pass, and finally a #5 attack. You are being taught to be free thinkers with many tools. 

I was lucky to be taught by a collection of very good instructors with GM Rene as the guiding light. You are being taught to be warriors, not soldiers who get a crash course in the box or some other aspect of what we do. 

You need to learn to see the weaknesses in the differing systems and the strengths in them as well. Example: a rolling shoulder, which is the trigger/power source for a short power attack, is a telegraphing signal (aka your head ache when you get hit) if used in a long distance attack.

Enough of that folks. We are still not taking new people in. I have recently said sorry to a few people because of that. On top of that, I am focused on making the people in our group, or people who want to come back, the best that we can make them. If that makes me a grumpy old man, so be it.

Proactive in Life and Training

CW

 

 

 

 

 

1 thought on “Answering questions about drills and skills.

  1. Nice thoughts Chris. I have to say that my recent experiences in LC school here in my region are quite poor ( light sticks..). Therefore I am looking at JUDO and will try my best to continue training on my own LC + regular visits to DK HQ!

    I have found a JUDO school here with a Police instructor. The reason why I started to be interested in JUDO in particular is that:
    – Grappling ( besides anti-grappling, vine techniques) was on the periphery for LC, however I have realised that grappling and wrest are my weakness. Fights tend to go into grappling quite often. Going around with a mindset of – I will finish it of before it gets to it – is asking for a trouble.
    -Many schools with lots of qualified trainers. This is the reason number one right now due to phony Kali / Escrima instructors I have met outside DK. More instructors, higher possibility to find and pick skilled warriors.
    – In theory, I can see Focus, Balance and Power very easily applicable right away. Also, JUDO is used as Law Enforcement tool and these guys do have knife/telescopic baton stuff included, so I am curious what is going on there.
    – STRENGTH! Throwing people around and being in wrest for quite some time will engage a whole lot of different muscles and build up endurance
    – Possibility to go for tournaments is also nice. It’s an Olympic sport, well received among general public. In short, it has cred.

    I will keep a log book of my reflections and try to keep an open mind to what is going on. I have this blog to dig through for ideas on training alone and perhaps I will find a HEMA school in addition to keep up with weapon training.

    Take care boss!

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